Pulled brisket for All Saints Saturday street food

A street food brisket bun ready to eat

A street food brisket bun ready to eat

Last Saturday we opened our Saturday Street Food stall at All Saints for the first time. Thank goodness the rain held off and we not only gave away 50 street food dishes in short order (sorry – it won’t happen again!) but sold another 50 after that before we started running out of food. Next Saturday we’ll be better prepared. We’re aiming to be there every Saturday over the summer offering Brindisa chorizo, grilled halloumi, Tudge’s famous sausages – and, of course, the pulled brisket that is the subject of this blog. In the (home-made) bun with the pulled brisket we offer garlic mayo, our roast pepper/chilli ketchup and coleslaw. It’s the business.

The more I slow cook meat, the more I love it. I love the shredded texture which so much slow-cooked meat gets and I love the deep flavours; the way the rendered fat mixes with juices and the meat itself to give a delicious but not oppressive richness. And once you’ve got the pulled meat it’s the ultimate convenience food – to be used in any number of different ways.

The recipe that follows is particularly aimed at eating in a bun for people at a party or (in our case) people wandering around Hereford city centre on a Sunny Saturday. But when I’ve made it at home I’ve always made a pretty big quantity and used the leftovers to make stunning ragouts to go with pasta as well as a wonderful beef and onion pie that’s pictured below.

a young pastry chef at work

a young pastry chef at work

the beef and onion pie with cream cheese pastry

the beef and onion pie with cream cheese pastry

At the cafes we cook overnight in our superb Rational ovens. At home I generally use our Aga (since it’s on anyway) but that requires a bit more judgement as none of its ovens is at quite the right temperature. The temperatures I’ve given here are aimed at standard domestic ovens. (In our Rational we do all our overnight slow-cooking of meat at 105C & 100% humidity but you can’t get that degree of precision in most domestic ovens)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feeds about 20 (but see above re. leftovers)

Spice rub:

2 tsp fennel seeds
2tsp chopped fresh rosemary
2 cloves garlic, crushed
30g salt
2 tsp smoked paprika (I prefer the spicey version but that’s a matter of taste)

  1. Toast fennel seeds.
  2. Add all of the rest of the ingredients and whizz or bash with pestle and mortar

For cooking the meat

3kg brisket, boned but not rolled
200cl dry cider
200cl water
50g molasses

brisket in the roasting tray having just been pulled and mixed with the cooking juices

brisket in the roasting tray having just been pulled and mixed with the cooking juices

  1. Rub spice mix over all the meat’s surfaces and try to get it into any nooks and crannies. Put into a deep baking tray fat side up. At home I use the biggest size of roasting tray that fits into our aga – 42cm x 30cm.
  2. Mix the other ingredients together (cider, water & molasses) and pour into the baking tray. Cover very tightly with strong foil – unless you have a lid which is even better.
  3. Cook at 120C overnight or for about 8-12 hours until the meat is soft and easy to pull apart.
  4. When it’s done take out the meat and pour off but retain all the liquid (including any melted fat); put the liquid in a gravy separator and discard any fat you regard as excess. You want to retain at least 100ml of liquid fat to give the meat the necessary richness. Discard any remaining solid fat and any grissly bits and pull the beef using two forks pulling in opposing directions. Put the pulled meat and the cooking juices together and mix well. Stick the pulled meat straight in a fresh bun or keep warm if you’re going to eat it fairly soon.
  5. If you’re going to use it later then as the meat cools you need to mix it a couple of times so that all the meat remains well coated in tasty liquid. Refrigerate until you need it. To re-heat just put the desired amount in a pan and heat until piping hot, stirring regularly.